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France 24 News

News News/Business. New.

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PBS

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00:31:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

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Channel 15

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mpeg2video

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ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
704

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

U.s. 12, Egypt 9, America 6, Edward Snowden 5, United States 4, Meade 3, Bradley Manning 3, Cairo 3, Michael Brooks 2, Greenwalt 2, Uk 2, Switzerland 2, Mohamed Morsi 1, El Baradei 1, Josh Levy 1, Leahy 1, Wikileaks 1, Manning 1, David Cameron 1, Mohammad Al Barrett 1,
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  PBS    France 24 News    News  News/Business. New.  

    August 20, 2013
    5:00 - 5:31pm PDT  

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clicks and less than 24 hours, bradley manning will know his fate. the army whistleblower could be facing up to 90 years in prison for the king government documents. and that date from fort meade just ahead. the nsa surveillance scandal taking a new twist overseas. the guardian's editor revealing that the british government forced the news publisher to destroy day-to-day from edward snowden. more on the government intimidation of the press coming up.
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in egypt, the crackdown of pro- morsi growing. a key leader of the muslim brotherhood was also arrested last night. more on the developments later in today's show. tuesday, august 20, 5:20 p.m. >> bradley manning is less than 20 hours from finding out how much time you'll spend behind bars after they found him guilty of stealing and sharing government secrets. the judge will make her final sentencing decision on wednesday. manning could face up to 90 years in prison. we have the latest from fort meade. >> the judge is now deliberating bradley manning's sentence. the judge announced that she would be beginning to
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deliberate. the sentences tomorrow morning and the importance to the judge in this case, facing a maximum of 90 years after he was found guilty of most of the charges against him including espionage. the closing argument of the sentencing hearing yesterday, the prosecution requested manning spend no less than 60 years in prison for leaking hundreds of thousands of documents to the anti-secrecy website wikileaks. in doing so, he betrayed the trust of the united states, his fellow soldiers, but national security at risk, and her diplomatic relationships. the defense did not request an exact number of years, but manning's attorney asked them to take several factors into consideration in order to give manning a fair sentence. this includes his young age, 21 at the time he was deployed, his
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troubled mental state highlighted during the sentencing phase, military health of officials sentencing that at the time manning was struggling with being a gay man in the military and dealing with a gender identity crisis. he is also a good candidate or rehabilitation and is asking him for a chance at life and becoming a member of society. he has been more than three years behind bars so far and will be credited the 1293 days he has already spent in confinement. the judges now in deliberations and says she will be ready to announce the sentence tomorrow morning. here in fort meade, maryland, rt. >> first, the guardian published articles about the uk government as part of the edward snowden revelations and over the weekend, david maranda was
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detained in the heathrow airport for nine hours and questioned using the british terror law. now, the british government intimidated him in several meetings over the edward snowden saga and gave him an ultimatum, either destroy all of the material on the matter or shut down publishing operations. here is the explanation on why -- why they decided to destroy the computer hard drives containing some of the secret files. >> i explained to the officials that there were other companies already in america and brazil so that they would not achieving anything but once it was obvious they would be going, i would rather destroy then give it back or allow the courts to freeze our reporting. >> what should we make of it? i was joined by the internet campaign director randy gave us his take on the revelations from the guardian.
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>> we should be very worried about it. this is an escalation in the battle between privacy advocates and whistleblowers and people in the nsa here in the united states or other intelligence agencies abroad who are fighting for the future of our right to communicate in private. the fact that reduce intelligence agencies are actually willing to go as far as what they have done and destroy the hard drives of one of the most prominent newspaper errs in that country and in the western world is incredibly frightening and it really shows what we are rough against here if we believe, as we do here at free press and many of our allies in a person's right to communicate in private and rolling back the nsa's enormous and overreaching surveillance programs. >> it sounds like you're saying this obviously goes beyond this
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case, but what about the on "the guardian?" does it impact journalists in general or just a kind of back and forth between the government and this organization? >> it affects everyone everywhere and is not just the specific leaks. this is a clear signal that the british intelligence agency was trying to send dan did send that any kind of dissent or reporting that goes against what they deem to be their priorities or their own messaging is fair game to go after those journalists. we have seen here in the u.s., the obama administration going after journalists from "the new york times" or fox news for perceived leaks. across the board and here in the uk, there is a clear message of intimidation being sent that if you get too close to home they will go after you. all journalists everywhere and
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anyone who supports a free press and who supports freedom for us to find out the truth about what our administration and elected officials are doing, anyone who supports of those things should worried about those developments. >> i want to you a quote and a response to how his partner, david miranda, was treated. "i will be far more aggressive from now on and i will publish many more documents and i will publish things on england. i have many things on their spying system and they will be sorry for what they did." healer getting a lot of slack obviously from a bunch of different news stations saying that it is revenge journalism, but is it justified for him to go all out on the uk government especially considering that is arguably with the uk government is doing to him and his fellow guardian journalist?
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>> this is more greenwalt versus the uk government. he is allowed to do what he wants. if he has access to information and he believes to be serving the public interest, it is his right to document that information and to write about it. what i'm more concerned about is the ramifications for this beyond greenwalt and whether or not what we are seeing is a chilling effect on people's freedom to communicate and our right to speak freely. >> we have just one minute left but this order allegedly came from the very top, this order to smash the hard drives. uk prime minister david cameron was the one who signed off on these. how is this different than if it came from a member of a spy agency? >> it goes to the very top. it is like any head of state signing off on this vengeance against a specific journalistic outfit. it is very worrying.
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we are approaching an almost totalitarian mindset in the uk and perhaps in the u.s. as well where there is absolutely no tolerance for dissent among the press and, as we have seen, they are willing to go to extraordinary numbers. >> josh levy, internet campaign director from free pass, thank you. another internet service is shutting down as a result of the edward snowden leaks detailing massive nsa structures. they announce that they will be shutting down because they cannot morally submit to government surveillance and allow their clients to be secretly spied on. as the editor puts it, there is now no shield from forced exposure. nothing in the parenthetical thought list is terrorism related that no one can heal protected enough from forced exposure and he more to say anything the least bit like that to anyone in an e-mail
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particularly from the u.s. out or to the u.s. in the bud really anywhere. you don't expect a stranger to read your private communications to a friend. once you know they can, what is there to say? constricted and distracted, that is how we heal. jones went on to say that there is no way for her site construction -- function without e-mail and surveillance. she encouraged internet users to take measures. to deal with things like encryption technology. this follows the decision of the security mail site that was allegedly used by edward snowden, a legal dispute for zimbabwe with the u.s. government. they frantically shut down their own e-mail service site. still ahead on rt, tensions remaining high between the government and morsi supporters.
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a key muslim brotherhood leader in government custody. all about the unrest in egypt after the break.
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>> three major developments in
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egypt. the spiritual leader of the muslim brotherhood was arrested overnight. this latest move is sure to further fuel the standoff between hard-line islamists and the military. also out today, the former vice president mohammad al barrett i -- el baradei backing out from the military-backed government and accuses the trail of trust. they told the daily beast on monday that military aid to egypt has been temporarily cut off. this is quite a different narrative from what we are hearing from the white house that says the aide is under review, particularly military aid, but on hold -- not on hold and not yet cut off. to be clear, technically the administration's rhetoric is not completely remiss. the promised aid to the egyptian
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military in 2013 is not due until september 30 of the selected still happen if things settle down before them. all the while, the clashes in egypt are still continuing on a daily basis in the streets of cairo. 1000 people have died and hundreds of others injured and there is no sign of an end. for more on what this means in the u.s. and the region moving forward, earlier i was joined from one of our reporters in cairo and i asked about the imposed curfew. >> right now, we are under government-imposed curfew. across the country, everyone is hold up in their living rooms staring at screens. it has been a quiet few days as the curfew really has put a stop to all of the protests happening through the night and through the day. the military has deployed a lot
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of tanks in the streets and people having to go through checkpoints to get home and there have been some instances of clashes at these checkpoints which have led to a death and security is really quite jumpy. egypt is largely calm and quiet. >> what kind of a curfew is it? is there anything you know about when it could and? clicks the curfew is every single night for one month that starts at 7:00 p.m. and finishes at 6:00 and this is one of the biggest curfews egypt has seen. we saw them during the 18 day uprising but this is the most significant and really they are abiding by it. the streets are emptying and that night, groups of citizens to form these popular committees go around in their neighborhoods essentially protecting their homes using anything they can and this can mean the streets can be quite dangerous if you're picked up i wanted those groups was --
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suspicious activities. it's quite a significant thing to happen to egypt and literally the whole capital is at a standstill as people are at home terrified of what clash will come next. flex is there any indication of what will come next? we have rumors that mohamed morsi could be released -- that mubarak could be released. could you talk about how these recent occurrences could play into this? >> it is still extremely tense and egypt. we had a very bloody week almost 1000 people killed. i have spoken to the political parties involved on both sides, the government and the muslim brotherhood and they are not really going to be able to reach any reconciliation in the coming days. the muslim brotherhood and the morsi supporters have called to an end of protests that were supposed to happen but security forces have at a stop to that and will not even allow people to gather in front of mosques. presidents around the areas of these mosques have also been
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stopping marches from happening so it's very tense here with small scuffles breaking out across the country. the news that hosni mubarak is going to be released will only add fuel to the fire. people are really feeling even the past several years since the 2011 revolution that nothing has changed if he is indeed in fact allowed to walk. was the brotherhood leaders are being targeted and [no audio] he was reportedly and attention. this is just angering the brotherhood and their allies even more. at the moment, extremely tense even though people are locked up in their homes. >> reporting live from cairo. to talk more in dep about the crisis in egypt and what it means for the u.s., the region, and the world am a i was joined by michael brooks, producer of
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the majority and host of intersection. i asked him what we should really make of these contradictory reports about whether or not the u.s. aid to egypt has really been suspended. >> obviously this is a fluid situation, as they say. it's a cliché but there are a lot of moving parts. senator leahy has said from the beginning that he thinks aid should be cut. he said this as soon as the military deposed morsi back in july and he is saying that it is a coup when the current aid scheduled to run through september 30 is completed that they will not get any more government -- money from the united states and the white house is saying that they are still trying to figure out the situation and the sequester has impact died the aid and it goes
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through american arms manufacturers who build the weapons that are then provided to the egyptian military so that is how sequester defense cuts would affect the aide. >> let's talk about how the aid would effect egypt and what's going on there. would it effect the? >> i don't think it would materially. the certainly, already both states and saudi arabia are very supportive of the egyptian military and they are providing a lot of money. they are certainly filling in any hole from the eu decision to suspend aid may have had on the egyptian regime. i do not think you would have much of a material impact although i do think it would be a smart idea at this point to clearly register the united states as still being on the side generally speaking of some kind of support for democratic institution building in egypt. >> let's talk about mohammed el
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baradei. he resigned last week. what could this mean for the muslim brotherhood? could tensions really flame up as a result of this gecko >> he is a liberal politician who rose through the ranks of the international atomic energy agency which he led. he was kind of emblematic of the liberal backlash against the muslim brotherhood for their failures and overreaches and government and done, unfortunately, they put their faith in a military coup, which is clearly what this is, and it has not worked out well. in order for him to kind of preserve his dignity, so to speak, he has had to resign. >> what about the spiritual leader retained?
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>> he is the former head of the -- the current head of the brotherhood, as you say. he was arrested in conjunction with accusations that the muslim brotherhood had ordered the killings of protesters outside of muslim brotherhood party headquarters during the initial wave of protests that brought down the morsi government. again, these things are very coyote. i don't think there is any real doubt that the muslim brotherhood may be involved in human rights violations. in the context of a military coup in the context of the wave of killings targeting muslim brotherhood activists, protesting the two and a real attempt to kind of eliminate them from the political space, obviously this arrest raises a lot of questions. i don't know. he might be guilty of some things, but given the context we are minutes very problematic. >> one minute left, michael.
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when the u.s. was supporting mubarak, really we saw how that played into it and now the u.s. is really taking a hands-off approach. talk about that. he could be getting out of prison soon. is the u.s. doing itself any favors? should it be more involved? >> i think to be fair to president obama, he has taken in general globally in many respects, a more cautious approach that has paid off in a fairmount of ways. in tca it too far, as your question indicates, and there is nothing really to be gained by not being clear and decisive in action around this. he eventually got around to supporting the thai rear square movement and that process took a little bit of time -- >> we're going to have to end it
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there. it is still very very up in the air. michael brooks, majority report. thank you so much. >> two years and four month since a massive earthquake and subsequent tsunami brought the nuclear infrastructure in japan to its knees. the world watched as the japanese government tried to contain the radioactive materials from spilling out by the millions of gallons into the pacific ocean. we watched as elderly japanese people volunteered to wade into that toxic environment sacrificing their own lives to attempt to stop the leak and save the country. today, we are getting news that they continue in the latest report is that it's built 300 tons of radioactive water and it is in a puddle nearby and it is separate from the one we reported on last week. a puddle of the contaminated water is e-mailed and 100 million sieverts per hour.
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according to reuters, the water is so toxic that within one hour, a person standing one foot away would receive a radiation dose five times the average annual global limit for nuclear workers. after 10 hours, the person will go into showing signs of radiation poisoning and need to go to the hospital. the japanese government calls this a level one out of seven on the international scale for radiological releases meaning that it's really all not that serious. japanese officials are working to correct the problem and they insist that none of the contaminated water has reached the pacific ocean but this latest leak just reinforces their long-standing concerns over the safety of nuclear energy. just about an hour ago or two, tv channel al jazeera america hit the air. al jazeera english rising to
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fame during the coverage of the arab spring uprisings but it did struggle to enter the u.s. news market with all of the competitors. the news channel expect did now to reach 48 million american households. >> this afternoon, al jazeera america when live on the air. after spending $500 million to buy current tv, they have a start up a staff of about 900 people including hundred newsroom staff and they will reach roughly 48 million homes here in the united states. access to viewers will be difficult as time warner cable, which dropped al jazeera america fter it bought current tv, areca reluctant to give time to a television station based out of the middle east. those who can watch will see some familiar faces like solar data brian but according to the channels chief executive, the
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alumni will not mean msn-style news. there will be less opinion, less yelling, and few celebrity sightings. he claimed they want a pbs-like news channel and that is what al jazeera america will provide but already they are shrugging off the new competition. a senior television news executive told the new york times that they will receive lower ratings than its predecessor current tv which only had 24,000 viewers in prime time last month. perhaps the best thing al jazeera america has going for it is the declining faith of the american people and its competitors in the mainstream news. last month, msnbc's ratings plunge to the lowest level since 2007 and after fox news's disaster us election night coverage and faith and political experts, they saw their ratings plummet at the beginning of the
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year also. in january, they saw their lowest rating since 2001. as for cnn, well, as long as there aren't any high profile murder trials, no one really watching cnn anyways. gallup gave the largest indictment of the mainstream news not irk showing an all-time high of americans, 60% somehow little or no trust in the media to accurately report the news. what does all of this mean? al jazeera america is jumping into an environment filled with decaying networks and audiences looking for alternatives. can they become one of those alternatives? we will have to wait and see. in washington, sam sacks, rt. >> switzerland has a new tourist attraction. this one is more like amsterdam's read like -- red light district than the majesty of the swiss alps. this is a drive in sex box.
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yes, i said it. a are attempting to promote safe sex practices for both sex workers as well as for their customers. essentially, they drive into a box as if it were a car wash and they get your pipes cleaned, if you know what i mean. . it only gets better. the service does not come for free. neither for the customer nor the government. the swiss government spent 1.5 million pounds or about 2,000,300 $55,000 to build these boxes open from early evening until 5:00 a.m. -- $2,355,000. they will be forced to buy a work ticket every night in order to conduct business. he must also register with a health insurer. don't worry. there is a safety alarm located in the box if things get out of hand. ok. so what?
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these women are working for their money. think about this. the latest u.s. state department report about switzerland raising huge about human trafficking in the region, particularly sex traffickers. between 2000 and 3000 victims of human trafficking live in the country and the majority are women to twin the ages of 16 and 25 and are used for sex. some of them are as young 14 years old. most of them come from hungary, romania, bulgaria, the ukraine, the dominican republic, thailand, and new guinea, and cameroon. the state department did recommend a number of things that the swiss could do in order to stop the abuse of these victims, however none of them included a sex box, i can guarantee you that. that will do it or now. visit yoyoutube.com/rtnews. captioned by the national captioning institute
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--www.ncicap.org--  it's wednesday, august 21s rr. i'm catherine kobayashi in tokyo. health officials are investigating. the normal rate of thyroid cancer is